Germany: Warnemunde and Rostock

2011-06-30_14-26-54_1282011-06-27_20-13-31_1592011-06-26_16-12-50_1712011-06-30_14-22-17_9622011-06-27_19-49-59_6192011-06-27_19-49-44_824
2011-06-30_14-21-50_8542011-06-27_20-13-58_1192011-06-27_20-13-02_5812011-06-30_14-26-58_5152011-06-30_14-22-46_2132011-06-27_19-49-48_523
2011-06-27_19-49-52_9952011-06-30_14-24-30_6232011-06-26_16-13-17_8572011-06-30_14-21-58_5642011-06-27_04-05-13_1152011-06-26_16-33-21_169
2011-06-27_20-13-51_2132011-06-30_14-23-15_4162011-06-30_14-25-25_722011-06-30_14-21-17_56a boat, taken from our veranda. Lovely ladies in rain coats

Germany, a set on Flickr.

Our cruise ship docked at Warnemunde, Germany which is as close as any port city gets to Berlin. This used to be in East Germany, which made everything feel a little dangerous. Most of the passengers went inland to tour Concentration Camps and to see where the Wall used to be. Somehow the psychic load of seeing those places seemed like more than I was willing to handle and I elected not to go. Most of my family decided to hang out with me.

Travis went to Berlin and enjoyed his trip. Randall had a horrible back ache and stayed in bed for most of the day. Our original plan was to spend the day on the beach but it was rainy, so the rest of us, 6 in all, decided to brave the drizzle and head into Rostock.

We umbrellaed our way to the train station and found our tour guide who was, hurrah for us, also taking the train to Rostock. She beat the information into our heads on which train, how to get there, etc. all the way to Rostock. Thank goodness. Some of us are better listeners than others…

The train ride was interesting and though the villages looked depressing and gray, the allotments out in the countryside were bright and beautiful and bountiful. They added some much needed color to the landscape, most of which looked unhappy. I can’t think of any other way to explain it. There were no quaint cottages, no anthroposophic buildings, just plain, newish architecture in depressing shapes and tones.

Dad came with us–he wasn’t thrilled by the idea of 6 hours on a bus. My brother-in-law’s mom was also in the same town (and on the same train) but she likes to do her own thing and wouldn’t join us. We did see her in the fabulous old church with the cuckoo clock. The clock’s characters are the 12 Apostles and one of them gets shut out at the end of the hour. Guess who that is?

Rostock was lovely, even in the rain. There was a market set up in the square with vendors selling fresh produce and things like that. European markets are always so impressive to me, coming from the land of waxed apples and bio-homogenization. In another square, farther from the tram tracks was a fountain famous for being the place the university students go to celebrate graduation. Apparently they all jump in and throw their caps into the air. The fountain was weird.
We had lunch at a wine bar and the food was quite good. Then we found our way to a place called The Tree House House. It was interesting and old and I think Dad enjoyed it. I could have taken a nap there. The clouds and drizzle and full belly made it so.

Eventually we wandered back to the train, leaving Elizabeth and Markie in Rostock to shop. They made it back to the ship, finally, and I won’t say anything else about that. Alright, I will. They got on the wrong train and went in the wrong direction and almost had to meet us in Estonia. But they made it back after all.

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About Blue Eagle Dreamer

Shamanic High Priestess and facilitator of empowerment and healing circles for girls and women, including a monthly Red Tent Temple. BA in English, minor in anthropology. Waldorf homeschool mom. Reiki master, cranial sacral therapist, herbalist, menstruvist, feminist, epicurian.
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One Response to Germany: Warnemunde and Rostock

  1. Karen says:

    It is a shame that you didn’t have nice weather. We have been to Germany many times but not to that area.

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